A blogging friend at Wordsworth House and Garden

It was a wet Wednesday when hubby and I visited a childhood home of William and other young Wordsworths. We ate lunch in the tearoom, looked round the latest exhibition (about a famous Lake District landmark – the Bowder stone) and braved the damp to visit the garden.

The autumn flowers had vibrant colours, which contrasted with the grey day. We were delighted to see that Fletch the Perchcrow, who was the first blogger I met in “real life”, was keeping a watchful eye on the garden. It was good to see the head gardener, Amanda, as well. (My first meeting with these two was described on Sue’s Trifles.)

Wordsworth House and Garden is open until 29 October 2017 Saturday to Thursday. There is a programme of talks. Reopens March 2018.

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Wordsworth House and Cockermouth

Earlier this month hubby and I went to have another look at the exhibition at Wordsworth House in Cockermouth. We also had a good look round the garden, which has recovered well from the floods of December 2015, due mostly to the hard work of the head gardener and her team. On a short tour of the house we learned some things which we hadn’t heard on a previous tour.

Afterwards we had a walk along the river, more or less retracing the route we had taken on a visit last year. The river was flowing quite quickly.

West Cumberland Railway Museum

On the murky morning, when I took the first photo in the previous post, I visited the West Cumberland Railway Museum in St Bees, Cumbria.

The museum was set up by an enthusiastic collector of railway memorabilia and opened in June 2016. It is housed in a building, which has been used in recent times as a shop and as a hairdressers’. The single room contains a variety of items connected with the local railways, either with the Cumbria Coastal Railway or with former lines in the area. It opens for a few days each month or by special arrangement for visiting groups.

The window on a sunny day
The window on a sunny day

For each opening the well-organised static exhibition is augmented by a display concentrating on a particular aspect of the local railway’s history. For example, the Furness Railway Company has been featured. This time it was the turn of the Maryport and Carlisle Railway. A particular station may be featured in the future.

One of the station signs
One of the station signs

The development of the railway had an impact on the economies of local towns and there was competition to have access to the rail network. Almost all the trains in West Cumbria (or West Cumberland, as it was) were used to transport coal and iron ore. Passengers were of less economic importance on these lines.

An example of tourist information
An example of tourist information

It is possible to look around the museum unguided, but the owner is very knowledgeable and provides much background information. The exhibits range from tickets and timetables to lamps, gadgets, signs and pictures. Maps and drawings also help to set the scene.

Among pictures, which once decorated the walls of compartment trains advertising places to visit, I spotted Wordsworth House, Cockermouth, no longer on the railway.

Wordsworth House, Cockermouth - a possible destination
Wordsworth House, Cockermouth – a possible destination