A walk from Great Wood to Ashness Bridge

On a fine Sunday afternoon at the end of March we set off to walk from Great Wood in the opposite direction from Keswick. The path with views of Derwentwater took us directly to Ashness Bridge – one of the best-known spots in the English Lake District. Many calendars of Lakeland views feature it. I had to be patient to catch it without people or a vehicle. We spotted wildflowers along the way. (Regular readers may know I am interested in #Wildflowerhour.)

Also along the way we were reminded how easy it is to have an accident even at relatively low levels. There was a rocky outcrop with water flowing over it. The path went straight across it. Perhaps it took two paces to reach the other side. Behind me Hubby stepped on the wet part and ended up lying down. I noticed a steep drop below him, but he hadn’t seen it and climbed back onto his feet and the path without further ado.

On the way back we went down to the shore of Derwentwater and walked along it. As it had been dry for a few days the water-level made this easy. We could imagine that at times the path becomes submerged. Near a waterfall we saw some interesting birds, possibly treecreepers.

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Birds near Derwentwater

These photos were taken on the same day as the oak tree in the previous post. Most of the birds are water birds on or near Derwentwater. However I cannot remember visiting the area without seeing lots of robins. I have pictures of two, but one of them is rather camouflaged. Swans are notorious for putting their heads under the water just as the shutter opens! There were lots of ducks and geese. We saw geese swimming, flying and walking.

Derwentwater

The shorter route I mentioned in the second of these four blog posts about a day out in September led us to the side of Derwentwater. I took a few photos near Keswick in the early afternoon and many more on the walk back to the car park after 4pm. Most of them are views of the lake. A few are of the scenery looking inland. One crag, which appears in my photos, has changed since then. A large piece of rock, described as being the size of a bungalow, broke free and smashed on the ground during the last week of November.

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There were a few ducks swimming in a quiet part of the lake. One of them did not match any pictures in my bird books. I asked on Twitter and learned that it was a cross between a farm duck and a mallard.

Related posts:-

Landscape in the English Lake District

Keswick and Derwentwater

A walk along Derwentwater to Keswick

Hope Park, Keswick

Walking back along Derwentwater

Autumn colours

And the three earlier posts in this series may be found by clicking on Previous.