Local history recorded on plaques

Walking round towns and villages in England it is possible to spot signs and plaques erected by various organisations with an interest in local history.

Sometimes they are too high or too weathered to be easily read. A photo may be enlarged to help decipher the writing on the wall.

My photos are all from Cumbria and taken using my phone.

Ludhiana Christian Medical college. (SHIELD AT TOP OF PLAQUE)
DAME EDITH MARY BROWN
DBE (1931). KAISAR-I-HIND (Gold 1922)
MA (Cantab). MD (Brux). FRCSEd. MRCOG.
BORN HERE 24 MARCH 1864
DIED 6 DECEMBER 1956 IN SRINAGAR, INDIA.
EDUCATED AT GIRTON COLLEGE, CAMBRIDGE.
THE LONDON SCHOOL OF MEDICINEN FOR WOMEN AND 
tHE ROYAL FREE HOSPITAL. SAILED TO INDIA WITH
THE BAPTIST ZENANA MISSION IN 1891.
FOUNDER PRINCIPAL OF TEH WOMEN'S CHRISTIAN MEDICAL
COLLEGE, LUDHIANA 1894-1942. PIONEER EDUCATOR.
REFORMER, ADMINISTRATOR AND SURGEON.
SHE SAW THE COLLEGE BECOME CO-EDUCATIONAL,
AFFILIATED TO THE UNIVERSITY OF THE PUNJAB,
AND WIDELY RCOGNISED
Plaque commemorating Dame Mary Edith Brown
Plaque commemorating 'Romany'
‘Romany’ of the BBC – The Reverend G. Bramwell Evens

The plaque commemorating the popular children’s broadcaster known as Romany was unveiled by Terry Waite, CBE.

Weathered plaque with text and a picture of a family crest with an illegible ribbon
A weathered plaque (text below)

GALE MANSION
Built by William Gale
In the 1730s as merchant
traders the family had strong links
with the Virginian tobacco trade.
William Gale was the brother-in law of
Mildred Washington, the grandmother of
George Washington, 1st President of the USA.

A walk around Rydal Water

Towards the end of April we went for a walk around Rydal Water with our daughter. Although it was a dull day it was rather busy before the May Day Bank Holiday. We followed the signs for Rydal caves and continued from the caves around the lake. I have picked out four photos to share here in what is the first post for a long time, which reflects the original purpose of this blog.

The captions tell part of the story. It was a pretty time of year with bluebells in flower and fresh leaves on the trees. April was a dry month.

A cave near Rydal
View along Rydal Water
A waterfall
View across Rydal Water: the highest English mountains (Scafell & Scafell Pike) are visible in the far distance

A visit to Fountains Abbey NT

On our way home from a weekend break in North Yorkshire we had time to visit a National Trust property. The nearest one to our route home (Rivaulx Terrace) was closed for winter, so we went to Fountains Abbey and Studley Royal. This involved retracing our route a little afterwards.

We arrived before lunch and went to the visitor centre, where a very helpful lady welcomed us to ‘the most beautiful place on earth’. She showed us on the leaflet a recommended route to take. We returned to the car to eat our sandwiches before setting off on what appeared to be a long walk.

Our undyed locks must be the reason people ask if we are OK to go down steep hills! The gradient seemed more gentle than the hill we live on.

The weather was calm and bright. Fountains Abbey certainly is beautiful. We both took far too many photos. I am spoilt for choice picking a few of mine for this post. We spent over three hours exploring the site, but didn’t have time to see everything.

View of a church tower and ruins through leafless trees. More trees and blue sky in background
First view of the Abbey
Collage of seven photos, showing different aspects of the Abbey
Collage of photos
View from the far side of the Abbey with a river in the foreground and trees in the background
Looking back at the Abbey and its reflection

Only a few days later the whole of the North of England was hit by Storm Arwen, which brought down many trees in the region. Fountains Abbey was closed on the Saturday of the storm for safety reasons. I hope the beautiful trees were not affected.

Another post is likely to follow about Studley Royal water gardens.