Too many hedgerow flowers to tweet

For some time I have been aware of the hashtag #wildflowerhour, which refers to an hour on Sunday evening 20:00-21:00 London time. There is often a theme. Last Sunday (6th May) it was #hedgerowchallenge.

The lane on a misty day
The lane on a misty day

A lane within easy walking distance of home has hedges on both sides. One side is sunnier than the other. Along that lane I took 35 photos using my phone camera as always. About three were duplicates, either to improve the photo or because I found a better example of the plant. My patient hubby accompanied me and pointed out some insects lurking in the undergrowth. Can you spot the ladybird (ladybug)?
Four of my photos have already appeared on Twitter. They show purple dead nettle, germander speedwell, vetch with a bumble bee and white dead nettle. Both sorts of dead nettle appear in my composite photo, although the white dead nettle is a different plant.
I have learned some more accurate names from other people’s tweets. Where I’d have known vetch, I now know bush vetch, for example.

Twelve photos of wild flowers
Twelve photos of wild flowers

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

My twelve photos show (from top to bottom and left to right) white dead nettle, hogweed, gorse at the top of the bank with brambles below, bugle on a verge, bugle under a hedge, violets and lesser celandine, two snaps of common scurvy grass (I think), hawthorn in bud, purple dead nettle, a flowering grass and cow parsley(?) with nettles, ferns and cleavers. The common scurvy grass was about two fields away from the foreshore, where it is flourishing.

The sunny side
The sunny side
The shady side
The shady side
Bluebell
Ground ivy
Ground ivy

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Common fumitory
Common fumitory
Dandelions
Dandelions

 

I only found one fumitory flower. The local dandelions are interesting. I remember being told that there were two varieties, which could be distinguished by the colour of their roots. One has white roots, the other red. The expert was a retired clergyman (no longer with us), who particularly enjoyed walking this lane even in his later years with failing sight.
I also took photos of herb Robert, buttercups, red campion (which looks pink to me!) and another flowering grass.

This year the flowers are later due to the very cold weather during March and April. (In case you missed it, the ladybird is near the ground ivy.)

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I’d rather enjoy the view

I’d rather… (this week’s photo challenge from the Daily Post) was also a writing prompt for a short workshop I enjoyed at Scargill House. The poem I wrote may be found on another blog to which I contribute.

For the purposes of this challenge, I’d rather sit in the front passenger seat. You may notice that we drive on the left in the UK, so the nearside passenger seat is on the left. My photos taken through the front windscreen (windshield) of a moving car do not do justice to the landscape. The snow from “The beast from the East” was lingering on the fells.

 

Battered beach and crumbling cliffs

The effects of the elements on the man-made and natural scenery at the beach are an obvious interpretation of the theme of this challenge from Krista and the Daily Post

The breakwaters or groynes take a battering, which helps protect the beach. Without the groynes the shingle would move farther. Pebbles still reach the foreshore. The cliffs are being eroded by waves and weather.

A large number of people braved the cold on New Year’s Day to raise money for the RNLI (whose volunteers were there to keep them safe) and other charities.