More pictures from trains

I recently made a trip taking more than six hours door-to-door each way. I discovered that it is much easier to take snaps through the windows of the slow diesel trains than the tilting electric ones. My outward journey was near high tide, whereas the tide was low when I returned. The high fells were snow-capped both times, but there was more snow on the way back. Both days had sunny intervals, making a contrast to my previous post with views from part of the route.

Outward journey

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Return journey

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A garden in spring

I went to a fund-raising open garden event recently.  The weather was good and there were some interesting plants.  I took some photos, which I am posting with the permission of the owners of the (private) garden.  As the garden faces north-west flowers bloom later than in some nearby locations.  It was my first visit in spring, although I was familiar with it from summer visits over a number of years.

Something funny happened just after I arrived.  A man with an electronic device in his hand came in through the gate and assumed I was about to leave.  I explained that I was going down the path next to the gate, obeying a sign near another path.  I explained to him where the people were.  “You pay up there and there are refreshments, too.”

“Pay? I’ve only come to read the meters!”

So I explained what was going on and joked about mistaken identity.  He told me he had been called by the wrong name that week as well.

Later the fundraisers told me some stories about uncanny resemblances between people.

woodland view with king cups
Woodland view with king cups
Woodland with yellow skunk cabbage
Woodland with yellow skunk cabbage
Lily pond
Lily pond
Camellia and hyacinths
Camellia and hyacinths

Lysichiton americanus (yellow arum lilies) are an American plant. They had arrived in the garden some years back, probably from a neighbouring garden. A stream flows from that garden into the one in the photos. It is a striking plant, but like many non-native species could become a nuisance.

Much of the garden is neatly manicured with a lawn, flower beds and a terrace, where garden birds feed on nuts in feeders. The woodland attracts other birds such as woodpeckers. Occasionally a red squirrel has been seen there.