A close encounter of the ovine kind

On a familiar path it seems unlikely that anything more exciting will happen than a chat with other people or perhaps a sighting of a butterfly or an unusual bird. One day in early April there were sheep and lambs in the field. Most were at the far end away from the path. Two lambs were lying down on the path. I stopped to take a photo from a safe distance in order not to startle them. They were not at all timid and came to investigate.

As there is a time delay on the shutter on my camera phone, I missed the first lamb as they raced towards me. One of the lambs then began to suck my trousers and my boot. Hubby was behind me on the path watching.

Mother sheep was minding her own business on a bank between the path and the fence. She went across the path with the lambs, but appeared to be ignoring them.

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A walk in Croydon

On Easter Sunday afternoon hubby and I went exploring in Croydon. I had studied a street map and worked out how to reach an open space. We skirted the park on the footpaths and looked for wild flowers. It was rather hot for the time of year, but more pleasant away from main roads.

There were people out enjoying the sunshine and the spring flowers, but I avoided them in my photos. I found at least two species of wildflowers which were new to me. (Help with identification of the cranesbill and the tree would be appreciated.)

A walk from Great Wood to Ashness Bridge

On a fine Sunday afternoon at the end of March we set off to walk from Great Wood in the opposite direction from Keswick. The path with views of Derwentwater took us directly to Ashness Bridge – one of the best-known spots in the English Lake District. Many calendars of Lakeland views feature it. I had to be patient to catch it without people or a vehicle. We spotted wildflowers along the way. (Regular readers may know I am interested in #Wildflowerhour.)

Also along the way we were reminded how easy it is to have an accident even at relatively low levels. There was a rocky outcrop with water flowing over it. The path went straight across it. Perhaps it took two paces to reach the other side. Behind me Hubby stepped on the wet part and ended up lying down. I noticed a steep drop below him, but he hadn’t seen it and climbed back onto his feet and the path without further ado.

On the way back we went down to the shore of Derwentwater and walked along it. As it had been dry for a few days the water-level made this easy. We could imagine that at times the path becomes submerged. Near a waterfall we saw some interesting birds, possibly treecreepers.