A coastal walk

Anchor
Anchor

The first photo is not a trick.  It wasn’t taken using a film camera and then printed back to front.  Nor was it flipped by a photo editing app.  It is a case of WYSIWYG (what you see is what you get).

The sandstone wall marks the start of the Coast to Coast Walk first planned by Alfred Wainwright, who wrote a series of detailed books about walks on the Cumbrian Mountains (or Lake District fells).  On the inland surface there is a sketch map of the route across the North of England from the Irish Sea to the North Sea.

Sea pink aka thrift
Sea pink aka thrift

On the reverse side is an anchor from a shipwreck and more information.  Coast to coast walkers are expected to wet their boots in the Irish Sea before making their way across a beck and up the path, which is also used by Cumbrian Coastal Path walkers, holiday makers and local residents.

The day in early June was summery alone among chilly days.  The tide was high as we set off, climbing the route marked by steps installed by the bodies responsible for maintaining the footpaths.  This stretch of coastline has the new name, the colourful coast, with signposts installed by the National Trust working with Cumbria County Council.

It would have been a good idea to carry some water on this walk.  Being unaccustomed to warm weather made me thirsty.  With a drink we’d probably have extended the walk on such a pleasant day.  As it was we reached the viewpoint and turned back.

Ribwort plantain
Ribwort plantain

The heat caused haze.  The view towards Scotland was not as clear as on an earlier walk.

Towards Fleswick Bay and the Solway
Towards Fleswick Bay and the Solway

However there were more flowers in bloom.  The sea pink or thrift is almost over in some nearby places.  There was a pretty clump near the path.  The ribwort plantain was in flower as well as common vetch, various grasses, gorse and others I cannot call to mind or with unfamiliar names.

Vetch
Vetch

Vetch is in the same family as peas.  The leaves are similar in shape and tendrils allow the plant to attach itself to anything nearby.  it is a joke in our family that when asked the name of a wild plant I frequently reply, “Some sort of vetch, I suppose.”

There were views towards the fells as we descended.

St Bees Beach and beyond
St Bees Beach and beyond
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